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. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
confrontation between israel and the palestinians has a new dimension tonight. egypt's new islamist government is promising to stand by the palestinians and is telling israel to end its air strikes on gaza. this as palestinians fire rockets at jerusalem and israel calls up 16,000 reservists, increasing the likelihood of a full scale ground war. correspondent david lee miller is near the israel-gaza border tonight. >> for the third day in a row, israelis ran from cover fired by palestinian militants in controlled gaza. more than 150 attacks were launched in the southern israel, that caused panic and destruction, but no fatalities. for the first time in the current conflict, air raid sirens were heard in jerusalem where two rockets apparently landed in empty fields outside of the city and the second day in a row, israel's largest city tel aviv was under attack, and a rocket in an unpopulated area, the rockets fired by palestinian militants now put more than 4 million israelis in their cross hairs, at this tel aviv cafe, it was business as usual after the air raid sirens stopped. >> my first reac
now. egypt is the main broker. egypt is also in contact with the united states. also, there is turkey's involvement, qatar's involvement, the head of the hamas political wing is also involved. in temz of creating with israel, egypt is the main broker. we understand it has not been confirmed for us that an israeli envoy is at the table or at least has been and is involved in these talks, but the impression we're getting from the israeli side is that they're obviously involved in the negotiations and each side is looking very closely at what the other is proposing. has each side sent enough of a message that they can say, okay, this is it. we've sent our message. we want this and that, and now is the time to get off the military ramp? we'll see. >> you've covered this. when you take a look at this situation on the ground and you realize the israeli government is calling up 75,000 reservists, massing tens of thousands of troops and tanks near the border at the palestinian territory, what does this say to you in terms of a ground invasion? does it seem inevitable? what do you make of what
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
, up into egypt across the sinai peninsula into the tunnels and into the gaza strip. jenna: is egypt complicit in this? >> that is a big question. and i think it's a question that very few in the media have bothered to ask. for the last several months the government of mohammed morsi in egypt has really been seen the responsible party for hamas. it was assumed that morsi had brought hamas under his wing and he was insuring that there would be calm. all of a sudden we find that hamas has these rockets smuggled into their territory likely through egyptian smuggling routes. the question is, what's egypt irrelevant or complicit. either way this looks horrible for the egyptians. jenna: of the rockets that were smuggled in, to the best of our knowledge and a lot of this depends upon intelligence that maybe we don't have access to, are all the robots smuggled in the longer-range robots, have they been destroyed by israel or are there more out there? >> we've seen israeli officials, including the ambassador here in washington, michael oren say that more than 90% of the rockets they are looki
're watching. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "cnn saturday morning." egypt on edge. thousands of furious protesters pack tahrir square after their new president makes a bold move for unprecedented power. so far, so good, that cease fire between israel and hamas is holding for now. but there are real fears even the slightest flare-up could kick off chaos. >>> how was i to know he would do a dumb thing like that? >> and tv's original bad boy. hollywood reacting this morning to the death of "dallas" star larry hagman. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 a.m. on the west, and here's where we start this morning. larry hagman's family says he was surrounded by family at the end. the 81-year-old actor died of complications from cancer. he's best known for his iconic portrayal of j.r. ewing in the show "dallas." it's a role that he always called his favorite. peter fonda said goodbye to his friend on twitter, saying hagman brought so much fun to everyone's life. cnn entertainment corresponde m correspondent careen winter joins us.
the president of egypt morsi, and the president of turkey. this is all part of an ongoing effort, as i pointed out to keep the violence escalating. there are positive indications of some movement there, but still, this violence ongoing there, viktor. >> there's a lot, dan, to discuss about the trip and this asia summit. it was really telling, and i truly sent it out through a tweet when someone asked about burma, and the president said this is not an endorsement. it's an acknowledgment of the reform. tell us more about the message for this trip. >> the president is responding to some criticism from some corners saying this visit is too soon. the administration did send secretary of state hillary rodham clinton healthing there last year, and they have an ambassador there, and many believe that's enough because it is the beginning of a long journey, the administration says, essentially the first few miles of a long journey. what the president -- the point the president was trying to make and others inside the administration is if you were to sit back and wait for there to be a perfect democracy
away and bring you up to speed with the headlines. egypt's president standing hard on his decree saying hey, it's only temporary. it didn't go over well. they demand that morsi lifts his rule. even larger demonstrations are planned for tomorrow. at least 117 people are dead after a massive fire at a clothing factory in bangladesh. it happened just outside the capital city of daka. you can see that every window is lit with flames. some workers did try to escape by jumping out those windows. 200 people were injured. officials say there were 200 workers mostly women, in the factory. they expect the death toll to rise. >>> china has successfully landed a fighter jet on an aircraft carrier for the very first time. china's official news agency says the aircraft carrier was originally being built for the old soviet union. it's expected to hold 30 j-15 fighter jets. it could be years before that carrier is fully operational. >>> and a six-alarm fire kept firefighters busy overnight. it continued until the early morning hours. two firefighters were hurt when a wall collapsed on them. 20 apartmen
. i'm randi kaye. we begin with the protests in egypt. over night protesters clashed with security forces. this was the scene in dammanhour north of cry row. reza sayah joining us. when can we expect the big one to start? >> reporter: the big one starts tuesday. they're calling for a 1 million main protest on tuesday. that's going to repeat calling for opponents of mr. morsi. but even today there are pro-morsi demonstrated takes place. they're going to be take place in cities outside of cairo. in some of these cities you have anti-morsi protesters as well. we've seen clashes in the early morning hours. they're going to attack the offices of the muslim brotherhood, supporters of the muslim brotherhood. things getting ugly there. the focal point of these anti-government protests remain here in ta rears square. i'm going to step aside to give you a live like look of what tahrir square looks like. most of them peaceful but we're still getting clashes and protests. right below they have set fire to an avis rental car center. you heard what sounded like a stun grenade. >> what you see he
's a bit of hope for a negotiated cease-fire. leaders from egypt and france are trying to mediate. for the past five days israel and hamas have fired rockets and bombed one another, israeli air strikes have taken a heavy toll on gaza and hamas. right now israel is keeping open the possibility of a ground offensive. they've got 30,000 troopons the border with another 75,000 reservists being called up. now, i want to show you something that played out live on israeli television just a short time ago. watch this. what you're called is called an iron dome. this is egypt's defensive zone system. they're tracking down two rockets. at the end, the small puffs there, that's the signals of success that those intercepters headed off those rockets. so far israel says a thousand rockets have been fired. hamas puts it at about 900. the constant threat has those in israel in fear. >> reporter: there's another attack, another rocket alert going on. we've got to get out of here. >> go, fred. there you see it. a strike in ash colon. we've got the pictures up as fred and our camera crew get out of
don't. >> dana: we will explain it in the break. we have to go. major power grab in egypt. susan rice blames the intel community. the anti-muslim video that we talk, he will speak for the first time. the foreign policy roundup is next. in [ male announcer ] are you considering a new medicare plan? then you may be looking for help in choosing the right plan for your needs. so don't wait. call now. whatever your health coverage needs, unitedhealthcare can help you find the right plan. open enrollment to choose your medicare coverage begins october 15th and ends december 7th. so now is the best time to review your options and enroll in a plan. medicare has two main parts, parts a and b, to help cover a lot of your expenses, like hospital care... and doctor visits. but they still won't cover all of your costs. now's the time to learn about unitedhealthcare plans that may be right for you. are you looking for something nice and easy? like a single plan that combines medicare parts a & b with prescription drug coverage? a medicare advantage plan can give you doctor, hospital and prescriptio
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
's targeting 100 sites across gaza. i know, youf heard this all before. this time it's different. because egypt is not happy with with israel. it's already reached out to president obama and told him, we must put an end to this aggression. sarah seidner is in the region and has the latest for us this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. yes, the number of those who have been killed during this escalation, fighting between gaza and israels had now risen. three people in israel inside an apartment building killed from a rocket attack sent from gaza, from hamas, the government here. we're now learning that 15 people have been killed here in total today, here in gaza, including nine militants, several children and a pregnant woman. what's happening now is off and on, we are hearing air strikes. again and again across the city, across gaza city and along the gaza strip. we know that there have been more than 196 rockets now that have entered into israel from gaza. we were there this morning when we saw ourselves 15 rockets coming in. some of those rockets being knocked down by th
. and if the diplomats, i know that ban ki-moon, the u.s. secretary general is on his way to egypt and israel. he's trying to get something going. i know representatives from all these other countries that have relations with hamas like e kwijipt and qatar and turkey, they're trying to get something going. there's intense efforts behind the scenes. i don't know if they're going to result in anything. i was asked yesterday what i thought the chances of a serious-fire were. i thought yesterday about 50/50. i haven't been able to talk with anybody in a position of authority here in israel. i've been here in the southern part along the border not far from the -- from gaza. but it doesn't look very promising. let's see if the diplomats can get something going. you point out that the feelings on both sides seem to be intensifying in a bad way. and i think that's right. >> senator john mccain came out and said, you know, we should send bill clinton in. he should be the mediator in this latest conflict. would israel or gaza welcome bill clinton? >> reporter: i've been saying that, actually, myself. i wro
to "early start." today a very important day in the middle east. particularly in egypt. delegations from both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement
the last few days about how the nation of egypt is really the key connection for the united states to both sides in the fight right now. and that was driven home today by the fact that when the cease-fire was announced, it was announced by u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton, and egypt's foreign minister at a press conference in egypt. >> in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. ultimately, every step must move us toward a comprehensive peace, for all the people of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya hyan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fir
, as egypt's new president rewrites the rules. >> the crowds are rowdy, rough, and down right rude, and the holiday shopping season has only just begun. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm radi kaye. it's 8:00. from maine to florida, millions of people are heading home as the thanksgiving holiday is wrapping up. today is usually one of the busiest travel days of the year, but so far it has been surprisingly quiet. cnn national correspondent suzanne candiotti is in new york hanging out with a few travellers this morning. suzanne, good morning to you. so i guess it's still pretty early in the day, but it should probably get pretty busy there later on. >> oh, it probably will pick up, but the best news of the day at this hour, anyway, is that there are virtually no backups to check in and no lines at security. there was a little flurry of activity earlier this morning, but now it's practically dead. this is the best time to fly on this busy, busy holiday weekend. of course, it is expected to pick up as the day goes on, but some of the things that are working in new york's favor, the weath
, and then you have egypt. they already have their peace treaty with israel, 1979 camp david accord. they said they will not interrupte disrupt that peace treaty, but egypt has strong relations with hamas. hamas was born out of the muslim brotherhood. that's why much of the world is eager to see if the two countries can get together and get these two sides to stop fighting. diplomatic efforts are continuing at this hour, world. >>> and there's no word i take it, reza, whether there will be joint public statements by the egyptian president and hillary clinton? we don't have an indication one way or another yet, do we? >> reporter: the last statements we received from the president's office was that there would be a press conference. that's what we are waiting for. we anticipated in meeting to take place earlier this afternoon local time in cairo with the press conference to follow. this meeting has gone on longer than we expected. >> we'll see if they announce some sort of cease-fire or some sort of great that hillary clinton is returning to jerusalem for more talks with benjamin knittenia hue.
. they were willing to pay for it. in egypt we really led from behind. this idea of having a hands off policy toward syria is about to blochb the whole region up. the war is coming to israel. it's affecting turkey and other places. so i believe that if they don't lead from the front that syria and iran are going to coming together and we're going to have a major conflict in the mideast. >> what was the best thing we got out the arab spring so far? >> the fact is authoritarian regimes have been overthrown the likelihood they will simply be replaced by other authoritarian regimes or some in some cases, yemen and libya qualify here the countries will descend into anarchy. parts will be controlled by al-qaeda and quote, unquote, success of the government controls very little territory. i think overall the arab spring has not brought democracy and light to middle east. it has brought a deterioration of the security situation and deterioration of the american interests and those of our friends and allies like israel and arab states. >> greta: there is such a division when it comes to domestic polic
's no trust between their history. something of a test period to s see. it's currently negotiated in egypt right now with egypt continuing. the next phase is going to be whether or not the various restrictions on movements across the border. the israelis have said they will consider that. not entirely. # this is very much a first step at this point in time. >> thanks so much. fred, what's the situation there right now? >> reporter: well, the people here are also quite happy that there's no many rockets raining down on them. what you're not going to be seeing here on the israeli side is celebration. that's because people believe that hamas will regroup and fire rockets at israel again. here is what some people told me today. after a week long military operation and rocket barrages fired from gaza you were they're trying to get back to normal. in the town that suffered through so many air raid alarms this is the first time he can take his kid shopping without fear. >> you feel like you're back to life. >> reporter: you won't see people celebrating the cease-fire here. many saying it's did ac
defending their civilian population. the issue would be whether the, the arabs and president mursi in egypt can appoint some sort of horizon for the people of gaza that would allow them to kind of climb down, this is about humanitarian quarters. the people -- government and hamas government in gaza is feeling a little bit more emboldened because of these sort of these visits by these high level delegations from places like qatar and turkey and of course egypt. so, this is about pointing the queue to a future where there's a political process in place, and i think secretary clinton's going to be looking very hard at how do you talk about what happens after this? because the only way people are going to stop, again, if they can stop, there are a lot of people in gaza with rockets and there's going to have to be a real concerted effort to, you know, weed those out, but also to create a political horizon. >> ambassador stuart holliday joining us this morning. thank you, sir, appreciate your time. >> thank you very much. >> ahead on "starting point" this morning, it's considered a key indicator
a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his top advisors today, and he said he'll consider that, but first there needs to be a dialogue. let's take a listen to the advisor. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president. not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible -- >> we are ready for our dialogue. >> are you prepared to consider rescinding adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president. accepting it we may have some reservations, but as a whole, we must take a step forward, not two backward. mr. morsi
of israel and hamas are in egypt separately for peace talks. hamas issuing its demand for a cease-fire. they want israel to end a long-running military blockade of gaza immediately. the carnage from the last 24 hours, arwa damon is in gaza city. >> reporter: the large slab of concrete and mangled metal finally gives way. buried beneath it, another lifeless body. it's the second child we've seen. there was also a baby. others in the neighborhood say the blast killed all ten people who lived here. israel says it was targeting a man who heads a rocket launch unit. people we spoke with said they never heard of him. this was a family home. >> people here are telling us that so far those who have been killed in this strike have been women and children. and they have not been able to find any survivors. just moments ago, from that back corner, they did pull out the body of a tiny child. an over here there's another frantic effort under way. tempers easily flare as frustration and anger mount. >> she's my uncle's wife, this young man shouts. rage coupled with sorrow etched across his face
break out in egypt as police fired teargas into the crowds. here are some of those scenes. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close ele
table. although, of course, it was an intermediary, and egypt, as we know, very well. right now the sense, though, is that this is not a long-term solution, so in that perspective, it is not that much different from other cease-fires. this is a temporary solution, and everyone here realizes the road ahead as it has always been is very long, very challenging, and that solution that everyone says they want, that still remains elusive. >> arwa damon, thanks so much. >>> let's cross the border now to the israeli side, the city that sits just a few miles from gaza and has been hit numerous times by hamas rockets. our fred plankon reports on the mood there. in the town that suffered through so many air raid alarms, igor says this is the first time he can take his kids shopping without fear. >> you feel like you're back to life. there are alarms and fire. sdmrul won't see people celebrating the cease-fire here. many saying the air campaign israel waged against hamas didn't achieve the main objective of stopping rocket attacked on towns. many fear the fire from gaza will start begin as
constitution for egypt cannot be disbanded. there's a lot of these represent is of the factions that we described to you that have quit this panel in protest saying they're not being represented adequately. with this particular decree, mr. morsi says this particular panel is going to move forward. again, his critics are saying it's a power grab. it's his way to push forth a panel right now that's dominated by islamic representatives. >> so interesting the steps you're laying out here. another one of the first things that the president is going to do is apparently call for a retrial of the former president hosni mubarak. why did he make this move? what kinds of politics are at play here? >> well, his position is he wants to clean all the remnants of the old regime. including the former prosecutor that he sacked last night with one of his decree. the prosecutor that's been in place for ten years. in this decree he says that all senior police officials, all politicians that were accused of injuring, cracking down on protesters, killing protesters during the 2011 revolution will be put on t
and complete testimony about what she knew and when she knew it, what she did. >> sean: let me move on to egypt, the consolidation of power, a power grab, basically the emergence of tyranny if you ask me as it relates to president morsi. what's more disturbing i think in many ways that hamas got credibility, they didn't deserve as a result of all of this, and i believe morsi was elevated by the white house and by secretary clinton, and i think the end result is that the only reason there's a cease-fire is because their missiles weren't effective, because the israelis were able to prevent they mean. them. i'm afraid they'll go back to the drug board and get bigger missiles that are more effective. what do you think? >> you're right. if you look at the wording of the cease-fire, it's pretty ridiculous. you've got the muslim brotherhood president as the arbiter of the israelis and hamas. don't forget the muslim brotherhood and hamas are the same organization. secondly, you have an administration, at least 2,000 people in the streets of cairo, saying we do not support this power grab. you've got th
hillary clinton has obviously been very busy moving between jerusalem, the west bank, egypt. nbc's stephanie gosk is live in tel aviv. what are you hearing about the cease fire? >> reporter: you know, we were on the cusp of a cease-fire it seemed like last night and it seemingly fell apart. however, we did hear from israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu that they still want a diplomatic solution, which is a real sign that at the very least the negotiations are still going on. we know that secretary clinton is shuttling back and forth throughout the region trying to make that happen. it's complicated today, chris, by this bus blast in jerusalem. there were at least 11 people injured, several of them seriously. officials here are calling it a terrorist attack although not a suicide attack. and as you know, it will be a familiar scene on the ground here in israel for people in tel aviv and all across the country. this was a tactic used a lot by palestinian militants about a decade ago. in recent years they haven't seen it. the last bus blast was back in 2004. and just soon after
in the west bank the right now she is in cairo meeting with egypt's president. mor morrissey is trying to broker a and when it happens we'll bring it to you live. wolf, i just wanted to ask about this bus attack in tel aviv. how large of a shadow does it cast? >> it's a very big shadow, the first time in at least i'm guessing six years that tel aviv has seen a terrorist incident like this. not that far away from the real commercial hub of the city. regular bus and about 20 people were injured. apparently a terrorist threw a bomb or whatever on the bus and escaped. the israelis did arrest someone later, but it proved to be a false arrest and they let that person go. there is someone on the loose right now who committed this. there are various groups claiming responsibility, though authoritatively no one has yet claimed responsibility. hamas did claim the incident, celebrated it, but didn't claim responsibility for it. one terrorist group claimed responsibility, but it's unclear from analysts if that's just a group trying to claim credibility that they had no involvement in. whatever it
, to avoid tipping them off that they were being pursued. >>> and a tragic accident in egypt has left dozens of children dead. at least 47 children were killed when a train collided with a bus carrying them to kindergarten. when security officials say it appeared the railroad crossing was not closed at the time of the accident. egypt's railroad has a terrible safety record. >>> and new information about the deadly accident involving a freight train and a parade float carrying war veterans in texas. authorities say the train was traveling below its speed limit when it hit the float, killing war veterans. investigators were trying to determine if enough warning had been given to clear the tracks. >>> and finally, history uncovered by hurricane sandy. the storm exposed the remains of a shipwreck on the dunes of new york's fire island on long island. the wreckage is believed to be a four-masted canadian coal schooner called "the bessy white." the ship became visible when the storm shifted the dunes more than 70 feet. how about that? >> it shows how powerful that storm really was. >> took an almo
. now to egypt where the country's new president is winning big-time praise from the u.s. for helping to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the ne
until 10:00 p.m. eastern tonight to buy that $2 ticket. >>> and overseas now to egypt, where opposition to president mohamed morsi is growing. for a third straight day, protesters hit the streets demanding he rescind a decree that gives him unlimited power. we get more now from cairo. >> reporter: outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time, the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsi. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> it's a one-man show. he wants to do everything. this is nothing at all what we want. >> reporter: on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that still is missing a parliament. >> whether it causes anyone to overturn any of t
rockets in any other way. of course there is some diplomatic activity going on, too, in egypt in particular, trying to organize a truce. only a 48-hour truce between israel and hamas. so there's a positive moves ahead going on trying to end this diplomatically. but not everybody is betting on that right now, alex. >> sounds like all the pieces are on the chess board for sure. thank you very much, martin fletcher. >> let's get some perspective on this crisis. joining me is military analyst general mccaffrey. is there a danger this could turn into a larger middle east war? >> no question. i think we're one step shorter of an all out ground operation in the gaza. i don't see how the israelis could top rate continued threat to huge parts of the civilian population. and then in the background, of course, we have the iranians and hezbollah on the lebanese southern border. the israelis are quite vulnerable to these rocket strikes. fit went to all-out war there would be significant israeli losses. >> all right, general, would the u.s. get involved militarily if this does escalate? >>
in preparation for war. >> ben joins us by phone this morning. egypt's prime minister paid a visit to gaza. somehow that going so far? >> well, it was originally planned it would be a three-hour cease fire while the egyptian prime minister was making this visit to gaza. according to our sources, it doesn't appear either side significantly reduced their level of military activity in gaza. certainly before the sun came up there was an intense air attack on gaza itself. it may have been lessened somewhat in the morning while the prime minister was touring gaza. but after he's gone, it's expected to get back to the same pace. >> there are elections coming up not too long from now in israel. palestinians are saying that may be part of the impetus for israel to be taking action. >> certainly this is what you hear oftentimes. tc it was the casame case in the 2008, 2009 offensive. they say the leaders are motivated by a desire to show they're strong on hamas. in fact, we spoke to one palestinian lawmaker who stressed the point that really this is all about politics. >> and ben, of course, one of t
hang on to the animals for now. >> if you have ever been to egypt, in egypt, in the tombs, the pyramids -- >> like a sphinx face. >> they used to try to d domesticate. you saw how big the tigers were? it won't get that thick. you see how thin it is. look at the ears of this cat. see why -- they didn't worship the animal but the animal represented royalty back then. i'm sure a lot of people lost their hands trying to domesticate this creature. what's unique, this is one of the only cats in the world that can jump ten feet in the air and catch a bird flying. they get in the grass, i have seen this twice in wild, they blend in so well, they live in the plains of kenya, tanzania, that part of the world, and they don't exist hardly up in egypt anymore. they lay down in there, watch for a bird and go popping up like that because their back legs -- >> ten feet -- >> it's amazing. they can grab the bird flying by. it's a caracle cat. that gives him away, the ears. >> okay. what's next? what are these? >> this is amazing. this cat also is a cat -- this cat also's a cat that is from africa. this
this before. the government in egypt shut down the internet last year during the revolution there that toppled mubarak. same thing with government in libya. in the months before rebel fighters took down that regime and ousted and then killed gadhafi. sometimes governments have also blocked access to the internet in smaller, more directed ways like pakistan and bangladesh turning off youtube this year on account of that insane islamophobic video that sparked protests across the muslim world. just this week the government in tajikistan turned off facebook after people started posting mean things on facebook about the president of tajikistan who apparently is a wuss. pakistan, they blocked twitter for a day because of a, quote, blasphemous cartoon contest. this kind of thing happens. government shuts off parts of the interprnet or the whole dar thing. because this is a thing governments do to their people, preserving access to the internet and means of communication that the internet affords us, that has become a significant part of the way the u.s. interacts with other countries. it's become a s
will primarily from egypt. hamas is considered to be the muslim brotherhood of the palestinians and president morsi of egypt has been stepping in trying to assert. he withdrew his ambassador. not a huge move but trying to lend moral support. they're condemning the israeli actions calling for calm. now there's some talk about them canceling the camp david accords, revisiting that. forget that. at the end of the day, as much criticism as the egypts get from the americans and the israelis, they may end up being the ones to negotiate a broker's truce in this whole deal because they do hold sway with hamas. >> is it clear how long this is going on? israel will say -- >> absolutely, 50 years. >> well, and a very large umbrella kind of sense. but recently, you know, we are talking about israel saying they were bombarded in recent weeks. hamas says they're being bombarded in recent days. which is it? >> typical tit for tat. it has a life of its own and it could spread to a much wider region, much wider effects on the diplomatic and political events of the middle east that after all is in a very fragi
of state hillary clinton is in egypt. earlier she met with palestinian president mahmoud abbas and prime minister netanyahu and had this to say. >> america's commitment to israel is rock solid and unwavering. the rocket attacks from terrorist organizations inside gaza on israeli cities and towns must end and a broader calm restored. gregg: general jack keane is a four star general retired. general, great to see you. this is shuttle diplomacy. she has been in jerusalem, ramallah, now cairo. can a cease-fire be brokered here? >> i don't think she would be here unless they believed a cease-fire can be obtained. i also believe she is here because they had legitimate concerns about netanyahu going on the ground in gaza. >> what does hamas wants out of this? >> they want open borders, access to those borders in a way they don't have them now. they want the naval blockade removed. they want a significant improvement in trade. >> reporter: wouldn't that facilitate even more smuggling of rockets into gaza most of them made by iran. >> they are pushing them through africa, into the sinai, and that
is speak together leaders of egypt. he is hoping that the government of qatar, turkey, that they can convince them to stop with the rockets and hopefully they can have an effort to achieve a long range solution. that's going to be very, very difficult as all of us know. but the prime minister ofgen he forces have been activated, they are in training exercises, not far from gaza and they will go in as brutal and ugly as that might, they don't want to do that because it'll cause an enormous amount of pain. israelis had a poor experience under gaza four years ago. and again with hezbollah forces. they don't want to do that but the prime minister feels he has no choice. the next 42 hours will be critical and i say there is a 50/50 chance after diplomatic cease-fire. >> wolf blitzer, thank you. >>> be sure to join wolf blitzer monday, 4:00 p.m. eastern, for "the situation room," a special edition live from jerusalem. >>> a peace effort under way it stop the violence. egypt working to reinstate a cease-fire. deputy general will arrive in cairo tomorrow. both israelis and palestinians say t
in cairo as egypt's new president rewrites the rules. >>> let's make a deal. will the white house and congress finally see eye to eye on the fiscal cliff? we're just over 24024-inch hours from the start of bargaining time. >>> plus -- >> push one of my kids and i will stab you. >> the crowds are rowdy, rough, and downright rude, and the holiday season has only just begun. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> it is sunday, november 25th. good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. overnight protesters clashed with security forces. this was the scene in. cnn's reza sayah is live this morning. how far are they actually spreading now? >> randi, the protests seem to be spreading. according to the interior ministry starting last night and continuing on to terrell morning hours, there were protests, demonstrations in the northern city. according to the government officials, they tried to attack the offices of the muslim breerhood and that's when you had clashes between the muslim brotherhood and their supporters and anti-mohamed morsi protesters. there were a number of injuries there. a
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